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Definition: Braising and Broiling

Braising (from the French “braiser”) is cooking with “moist heat,” typically in a covered pot with a variable amount of liquid, resulting in a particular flavour.

Braising relies on heat, time, and moisture to successfully break down tough connective tissue and collagens in meat. It is an ideal way to cook tougher cuts. Many classic braised dishes such as Coq au Vin are highly-evolved methods of cooking tough and unpalatable foods. Swissing, stewing and pot-roasting are all braising types.

Most braises follow the same basic steps. The meat or poultry is first seared in order to achieve a good crisp texture. Aromatic vegetables are sometimes then browned as well. A cooking liquid that often includes an acidic element, such as tomatoes or wine, is added to the pot, which is covered. The dish cooks in relatively low heat in or atop the stove until the meat is fork-tender. Often the cooking liquid is finished to create a sauce or gravy.

Broiling (exclusive to American and Canadian English) or grilling (elsewhere in the English speaking world) is a process of cooking food with high heat with the heat applied directly to the food, most commonly from above. Heat transfer to the food is primarily via thermal radiation. As it is a way of cooking without added oil, it is popular in low-fat diets.

In electric ovens, broiling/grilling may be accomplished by placing the food near the upper heating element, with the lower heating element off and the oven door partially open. Broiling in an electric oven may create much smoke and cause splattering in the oven.[1] Gas ovens often have a separate compartment for broiling, as a drawer below the flame.

Content courtesy: Wikipedia

By Sid Khullar

Sid Khullar is a wellness coach who works with different aspects of lifestyle change towards the accomplishment of goals such as weight loss and blood sugar management among other health situations that require the presence of specialised, precise diets and lifestyle change. His methods address aspects of food, nutrition and the mind.