Tupperware Juist – Surprisingly Handy!

At first, a manual juicer doesn’t evoke a great deal of passion. It’s essentially a press to squeeze those luscious juices out of oranges, berries and mausambis among other fruits. So, why do we have a review, an entire article on the Tupperware Juist?

As it turns out, this product has so many design sensibilities, an entire article was indeed called for.

Tupperware Juist: Form

The Juist makes juicing citrus fruits very easy. The pattern of ridges on the plastic make it better at squeezing out the last drops of juice, which otherwise doesn't happen with the traditional metal devices we have at home.
The Juist makes juicing citrus fruits very easy. The pattern of ridges on the plastic make it better at squeezing out the last drops of juice, which otherwise doesn’t happen with the traditional metal devices we have at home.

The Juist is pleasing to look at, easily spotted due to its bright red colour, is made of high quality, food grade plastic, has no corners; only curves and is built to withstand a great deal of pressure. The design is quite thoughtful, if you take a few minutes to sit back and just look at the product. The product consists of three components – a jar at the bottom that holds the juice, a mesh in between and a plunger or press at the top. Each component stacks one on top of the other and is thus easy to store. All the components are easy to clean and a gush of running water is typically enough to quickly wash, stack and store.

The grooves in the rim of the main container interlock with ridges on the border of the mesh, ensuring the mesh doesn’t move (rotate) while juice is being pressed out of a citrus half, or when a citrus half is placed on the reversed mesh and pressed and wiggled. The jar is also marked for volume measurement and quite endearingly, has a slight lip on the side to make pouring out the juice easier. The jar also has a circle of rubberised plastic at the bottom, to prevent it from skidding on smooth surfaces, which is very thoughtful.

The mesh itself is double sided, which means you can either place a citrus half cut side down into the mesh-hole and press down with the plunger, or you can reverse the mesh, making the hole into a mound, and mash the citrus half on it for the same effect. The mesh locks securely into the jar below. The gaps in the mesh are large enough to allow some pulp to pass, while also small enough that seeds do not fall through.

The plunger or press has enough surface area at the top to make pressing down a painless activity; thoughtful, when one considers the number of halves required to press juice for a normal family. A smaller top would have concentrated pressure on the palm and resulted in pain and possibly contusions. Additionally, the mesh and the plunger have a matt finish, ensuring the Juist isn’t likely to slip, even when pressing hard.

Thoughtfully designed, wouldn’t you say?

Tupperware Juist: Function

A rubberised ring prevents the Juist from slipping when pressure is applied at the top in press-mode. Also, the plunger can be filled with raw rice to increase its weight and efficiency!
A rubberised ring prevents the Juist from slipping when pressure is applied at the top in press-mode. Also, the plunger can be filled with raw rice to increase its weight and efficiency!

The Juist is designed to quickly squeeze the juice out of fruits in two ways, one by pressing and the other by mashing. The good news is that juice extracted thus falls under the general category of cold pressed juices, which are inherently healthier and have a longer life, than traditional centrifugal juicing techniques. Read more on this here. Also, you can juice berries, pineapples and many other fruits using the Juist’s press functionality.

  1. Just cut your fruits into halves, reserve.
  2. Place the Tupperware Juist on a level, preferably matt surface.
  3. If you’d like to juice a citrus fruit
    1. Place the mesh on the jar, such that you’re looking at a mound.
    2. Place half a citrus fruit , cut side down on to the mound.
    3. Press down hard and rotate, mashing the fruit on the mound.
  4. If you’d like to juice a non-citrus fruit
    1. Reverse the mesh, so you have a hole in place of the mound.
    2. Drop everything you’d like to juice into the hole
    3. Press down with the plunger until you believe the fruit is spent.
  5. Continue until you have enough juice.
[quote]The Juist‘s plunger is hollow and can be filled with raw rice or other material (such as kidney beans for example) to increase its weight as well as its effectiveness for pressed juicing.[/quote]

There you have it. Cold pressed, healthier juices through the Tupperware Juist, which I think is a superbly designed product and an example of how good product design can make so much of a difference! What do you think? What sort of juices do you drink? What juicer do you use?

Tip: If you don’t refrigerate your fruits, an ice cube or two in the jar will help you quickly serve cold juice.

Sid Khullar

Sid Khullar is the founder of Chef at Large, a blog that began in 2007. He enjoys cooking, writing, travelling and technology in addition to being a practising Freemason. Health and wellness is a particularly passionate focus. Sid prefers the company of food and animals to most humans, and can be reached at [email protected]

  • Reem Khan

    I love all kinds of juices, in fact want a glass of orange juice ready, when I wake up on Friday mornings.
    For that, I have a manual one.

    I also have Braun centrifugal juicer, which I use for carrots, apple, tomatoes, beetroot, pineapple, grapes, etc, but rarely, as I feel lazy to remove it every time, and the cleaning of various parts is a pain.
    Especially the stainless steel sieve, it needs lots of detailed cleaning, and still I don’t feel completely satisfied.

    As much as I love juices, I prefer eating the whole fruit, as there’s a lot of fibre loss.

    That’s a very well written, detailed review.

    Thanks Sid!

  • Pinali Shukla Mehta

    Wow. It’s really handy. Very well written. Thank you for sharing!!